Featured

National Camera Day

From nationaltoday.com:

Smile! National Camera Day is June 29, a day to celebrate the fact that photography, once so complicated it took a scientist to understand, is now part of our everyday lives. The word “photography” is based on two Greek words that, when put together, mean “writing with light.’” It’s a beautiful way of describing what a camera lets us do — tell a story without the use of words. It all goes back more than 800 years to the invention of the camera obscura. Meaning “dark chamber,” the camera obscura was nothing more than a box with a hole on one side. Light would pass through the hole and into the dark interior of the box, where it would project an image onto the flat inner surface. Unfortunately, when the light was gone, the image disappeared — like Instagram, but without an actual photo. Fast-forward through the centuries to today, when everyone with a smartphone has a camera at their fingertips. Whether you love shooting film and changing lenses or prefer the ease of digital, use June 29 to focus on how cameras have made telling our stories easier than ever.

Featured

UPC July 5th Zoom meeting

July 5, 2020, 11:00 AM

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83605813968

Meeting ID: 836 0581 3968
One tap mobile
+16699006833,,83605813968# US (San Jose)

Dial by your location
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 836 0581 3968

Our theme this month is “postcard”. One approach would be to replicate historic postcards like the one above, which can be found at http://rparker.pacificsites.com. As usual, the theme is for you to interpret or ignore as you please (send photos to ukiahphotoclub@comcast.net). Mimi will show us how she photographs her pottery and we will have time for photo announcements and discussions.

Featured

My first camera

Here’s your chance to tell us about your first camera. Get technical. Get nostalgic. Embelish! What was it called? Give us a link to a picture of it. Do you still have it? What kind of film did it use (or how many megapixels)? How did you acquire it (gift, purchase, hand-me-down)? What did it mean to you? Is there a path between this camera and the one you shoot now (we know that Park still uses a fifty year old lens)? Or, perhaps, do you not remember or not care? I’ll start it off with my own in the comments below (hint: that’s it above).

Featured

Photography under shelter-in-place

Can’t get out for that perfect shot of Half Dome or the Golden Gate Bridge? Here are some ideas to help you maintain and even develop your photographic skills from the comfort of your home.

James Tocchino’s article, Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home at CasualPhotophile, is directed at both film and digital photographers. I can see us doing a future theme of self portraits (not selfies), and, seriously, would it kill you to dust off your old film camera?

A similar article, How to Be a Productive Photographer When You’re Stuck at Home, comes from Luca Eandi at keh.com.

Want to contribute to scientific research? Check out What’s Happening to the Monarch Butterfly Population? in the New York Times. I think I saw one in my yard yesterday but by the time I grabbed my camera it was gone.

And of course, keep the photos coming in to ukiahphotoclub@comcast.net and your comments to ukiahphoto.club.